Soil Analysis

Soil Analysis Results

Test Date:  August 16, 2011

Lab:  Earth Co.

Sample  Location  pH Texture Organic
Matter
N P K Ca Mg S Z Fe Mn Cu B
1 Zone 1 – Street Side 7.2 Sand: 68
Silt: 28
Clay: 5
3.5 1 2.6 2.4 56.4 7.9 0.6 9.4 1.4 11.6 0.8 1.4
2 Zone 2 – Under Pine 7.2 Sand: 73
Silt: 21
Clay: 6
3.6 1.7 4.9 5.3 69.9 11.4 1 25.1 2.1 8.8 1.3 1.7
3 Zone 4 – Azalea,
Manzanita
7.3 Sand: 75
Silt: 23
Clay: 3
3.6 1.5 2.4 1.7 52.8 7.3 0.6 21.4 1.4 6 1.2 1
4 Zone 5 – Grass 7.5 Sand: 65
Silt: 28
Clay: 8
3.7 2.7 1.7 1.8 55.8 7.7 0.6 8.9 1.4 9.2 1.1 1.2
5 Zone 10 – Entrance
Succulents
6.9 Sand: 68
Silt: 25
Clay: 8
3.5 1.8 2.1 4.9 67 9.6 0.7 9.6 1.5 10 1.2 1.4
6 Zone 8 – Mehonia,
Liriope, Oaks
6.9 Sand: 67
Silt: 30
Clay:3
3.8 1.7 2.6 3.5 59.4 10.7 0.6 11.3 1.8 8 1 1.6
7 Zone 13 – Back Steps, Native Iris 6.7 Sand: 70
Silt: 23
Clay: 8
3.8 1.2 1.4 1.9 60 6.8 0.6 11.1 1.9 11.2 0.9 1.4
8 Zone 24 – Lower
Main Succulents
7.4 Sand: 68
Silt: 25
Clay: 8
3.7 1.4 6 3 78.2 8.6 0.4 30.4 2.3 6 4.8 1.3
9 Zone 19 – Vegetables 6.9 Sand: 68
Silt: 25
Clay: 8
3.4 1.1 3 3.5 66.7 10.4 0.7 10.5 1.3 9.2 0.8 1.4
10 Zone 16 – Grass 7.1 Sand: 68
Silt: 26
Clay: 6
3.6 1 3.1 3.2 63.1 9.2 0.3 7.2 1.3 10.4 1 1.7

Observations:

  1. ph:  Soils are more alkaline than I expected.  For some reason, we were expecting pH of 6 to 6.5 (always expecting perfection!).  But, this makes sense given the fact that our climate is much more dry than those areas of the country (NW) where rainfall is abundant, soils have higher organic content, and soils are much more acidic.
  2. Soil Texture: Sandy Loam, good.
  3. Organic Matter:  Ideal organic matter content is generally thought to be 5%. We need to mulch more often and amend soils when planting new plants.  This should also help to adjust pH (downward) and balance other nutrient levels.
  4. Nitrogen:  Vital to vegetative growth and greening. Low throughout the property.  The highest reading is within the front lawn area, which is newly planted and has been recently treated with 15-15-15 (at planting time in early July) and Urea (46-0-0) (in early August). Given sandy loam, high infiltration rates in soil (observed), and runoff (due to topography), apply more frequently but in lower doses.
  5. Phosphorus: Important for flowering and fruiting. Lowest phosphorus levels in new grass (Sample 4) and native iris mass planting (Sample 7). See also Potassium levels in native iris area; plants have been showing yellowing leaves.  Use 15-15-15, to add 1/2 to 1 lb per sf.   Apply pre-growing season (fall).  Higher levels of P are in the main back planter — unclear why – do not apply fertilizers.
  6. Potassium:   Important to good root growth, photosynthesis, maturation and disease resistance.  Low across the property.  Consider K specific fertilizer (potash)
  7. Micronutrients (Ca, Mg, S, Z, Fe, Mn, Cu, B):  Fe levels throughout are moderate. Monitor for signs of Fe deficiency (chlorosis).
  8. Plant Micronutrient Availability:   Based on conventional nutrient availability analysis, as demonstrated in a Nutrient Availability Chart, the higher pH of our soil will limit nutrient availability of Fe, Mn, B and Z.  Those nutrients are essential for production of sugar and carbohydrates (, formation of chlorophyll and promotion of photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism (Mn)
  9. Main back succulent planter (sample 8):  Shows numerous variances from rest of samples.  It has the highest P, highest Ca, second to lowest level of S, highest level of Zn, highest iron, second lowest Mn, and highest Cu.  Clearly something wrong here.  It often receives excess runoff (down the stairs) and water often pools here.  Could the sample have been contaminated?
  10.  Native Iris area (sample 7):  Low N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe.  This area was, until spring 2011, a dead zone (few plants, no water).  Add organic material throughout. Need to add fertilizer in this area.     

Your Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s